Temprite Climate Solutions Blog: Archive for the ‘Air Conditioning’ Category

Is a Dead Compressor the End of the Line for an AC?

Monday, August 22nd, 2022
compressor-in-ac-unit

You’ve likely heard this bit of conventional wisdom about the compressor in an air conditioning system: 

When the compressor of an AC dies, the whole AC must go with it. A compressor is an expensive piece of equipment, and replacing it is too costly compared to the long-term benefits of getting a new air conditioner.

Like most nuggets of conventional wisdom, there’s some truth to this, but also some myth. A dead compressor in an AC is not an absolute command to have the entire air conditioning system replaced. There are several options a homeowner can consider when the compressor fails, and a complete replacement isn’t always the best. Below we’ll look at the variables involved in what to do when you’ve got an AC with a dead compressor.

Continue Reading

5 Ways to Prevent Your AC From Overheating

Monday, August 8th, 2022
air-conditioner-with-clipboard-on-top

The heatwaves just keep rolling in, and with that, we’re running our air conditioning units harder than ever before. Not only is continuous AC use an intense strain on power grids and electricity bills, but the wear and tear can easily break down units at accelerated rates. This leads to an all-too-common problem at the height of seasonal extremes—permanent AC failure!

As costly as it is problematic, experiencing a unit breakdown is a huge issue on these scorchingly hot days! Thankfully there are plenty of methods to mitigate disaster and save homeowners from such a hassle. The keyword here is certainly prevention, as those in need of a fix have to give their local AC repair folks a call.

Continue Reading

Facts About How Cool Your AC Can Make Your House

Monday, July 25th, 2022
AC-fan
Spinning fan closeup.

When temperatures rise during the summer, you’ll turn to the air conditioning system to cool down your house. While looking at the settings on the thermostat, you may wonder just how cool the AC could potentially make your home. On most thermostats, the lowest setting allowed is 10–15°C, and that’s too cold for most people. Can the AC actually get your house that cool? Could it potentially go farther if the thermostat settings went lower?

We think this is a good question to ask, because it’s not only a theoretical exercise. Knowing the cooling limits of an air conditioning system can help you understand some important basics about how it works and how best to use it. We’ll explain the facts about your AC’s limits below.

Continue Reading

What’s a “Packaged HVAC Unit”?

Monday, July 11th, 2022
technician-and-packaged-unit

The most common type of central air conditioning system and heat pump used for homes is known as the split system HVAC unit. But this isn’t the only type available. Many commercial buildings use a different type of heat pump/air conditioner known as a packaged HVAC unit. These HVAC systems are sometimes used for residential buildings as well, although this is much less common.

We offer service for packaged HVAC units in Courtenay, BC. We’ll talk about what sets packaged HVAC units apart from split systems as well as the advantages they can offer to the right business facility. 

Continue Reading

Refrigerant Leaks From Your AC Need Fast Repairs!

Monday, June 27th, 2022
air-conditioner-coils

Refrigerant leaks are a problem that can strike any air conditioning system. Just because they’re common doesn’t mean they aren’t serious. A refrigerant leak will lead to a string of problems that eventually conclude with an air conditioner permanently breaking down when its compressor fails. 

In this post, we’ll look at why refrigerant leaks are such a problem for an air conditioner and how you can recognize leaks so you can call us for air conditioning repair in Qualicum Beach, BC.

The Danger of Refrigerant Leaks

People often misunderstand the job of refrigerant in an air conditioning system. They may know that the refrigerant is what somehow makes the air cooler, but they may also believe that the air conditioner runs off the refrigerant as if it were a fuel source. 

So we want to make this clear: an air conditioning system does not use up refrigerant like a fuel. The amount of refrigerant in an AC, known as the system’s charge, should remain constant for the life of the unit. Refrigerant goes through a process of evaporation and condensation to allow it to move heat from indoors to outdoors, and during this process, it never dissipates. 

This is why leaks are trouble: they lower the charge of the air conditioner. This makes it harder for the AC to absorb enough heat to provide adequate cooling. But there are even more problems. An AC is designed to run at a specific charge, and if that charge drops because of leaks, it jeopardizes the whole air conditioner. Not only will heat absorption drop, but the AC will drain extra power, its coils will freeze, and the compressor will finally overheat. A burnt-out compressor is expensive to fix, and in many cases, it’s more cost-effective to replace the whole AC.

Noticing Refrigerant Leaks

Leaking refrigerant is difficult to notice at first. These leaks are tiny, often the size of pinholes, that form at spots of corrosion along the refrigerant lines. But you can pick up on when an AC is running with lower refrigerant by looking for these warning signs:

  • A hissing or bubbling sound coming from parts of the AC. These are the sounds made by gaseous or liquid refrigerant escaping from refrigerant lines.
  • A change in indoor humidity. With lower amounts of refrigerant, an air conditioner will pull less moisture from the air as the refrigerant evaporates in the evaporator coil. You’ll often notice a change in humidity before you notice a drop in cooling. 
  • Ice forming along the evaporator coil. It may seem odd that less refrigerant would cause ice, but this is an example of why the balance of refrigerant is so crucial for an AC. Too little refrigerant won’t absorb enough heat to warm up, so it will remain too cold and cause ice to form on the coil.
  • The air conditioner begins to turn on and off rapidly, known as short-cycling. Many different malfunctions can cause this, so you’ll want it looked at regardless of whether it’s due to leaking refrigerant. 

Please act quickly when you suspect something is wrong. The sooner we’re on the job, the less danger of your air conditioner needing a larger repair.

Temprite Climate Solutions: For a job done right, call Temprite!

Continue Reading

How Your Thermostat Works With Your AC—And How You Can Take Advantage of It

Monday, June 13th, 2022
thermostat-celsius-settings

There are many misunderstandings about how air conditioning systems work that we encounter. For example, air conditioners don’t “use up” refrigerant and won’t need to have any more put in unless the refrigerant leaks out. 

One of the most common misconceptions about air conditioning systems is about how the thermostat controls the AC. People often believe that the farther they lower the thermostat, the harder the air conditioner will work to deliver cooling. So if people want faster cooling for their house, they’ll push the thermostat setting to its lowest temperature. Except, this isn’t how the thermostat or AC works. 

Below we’ll examine the thermostat-air conditioner connection and how you can use this knowledge to save energy while still keeping cool in summer. 

Continue Reading

Several Special Benefits of Regular AC Maintenance

Monday, May 16th, 2022
air-conditioner-with-dirty-coils

In April we posted about how it’s a great month to schedule your regular air conditioning maintenance to prepare for the coming summer. It’s May now, but that doesn’t mean you’ve run out of time or passed the “expiration date” for maintenance. We’re still in spring and your AC hasn’t started the heavy work yet—this is also a good time for you to call us to arrange for professional air conditioning maintenance in Courtenay, BC. We have an excellent residential maintenance program, the Comfort Club, to make it easy for you. Don’t delay, however! You don’t want the hot weather to catch you off guard with an AC that isn’t in the best shape to handle a heatwave.

Perhaps you need a bit more convincing? We’ve put together a few of the benefits of regular AC maintenance tune-ups and inspections that you don’t hear about as much, but which are still valuable.

Continue Reading

Planning for a New AC Before Summer? Here Are Some Tips

Monday, April 18th, 2022
central-air-conditioner

No central air conditioning system lasts forever. In fact, it’s rare for an air conditioner to last much longer than 15 years without turning far too expensive to run and continue to repair. You may be in a situation where you know you’ll need a new air conditioning installation in Qualicum Beach, BC before the summer heat arrives. 

If this describes you, we want to help. Installing a new air conditioner can seem daunting, but we have tips to help make the process easier for you.

Continue Reading

April Is the Month for Air Conditioning Maintenance!

Monday, April 4th, 2022
air-conditioning-manometer-pressure-refrigerant

We want our customers to enjoy comfort from their HVAC systems that is reliable, effective, and affordable. One of the best tools we have to help them achieve this is regular maintenance service and our special residential maintenance plan. Through the plan, our valued customers receive fall tune-ups and inspections for their heating systems, and then in spring their air conditioners get the same quality treatment.

Guess what season it is? The calendar says April, so it’s spring. Even with cooler weather, April is the ideal time to arrange to have maintenance done for your home’s central air conditioning system. If you aren’t already a member of our residential maintenance plan, we recommend you talk to us today to sign up. We’ll then get you on the schedule for air conditioning maintenance in Tofino, BC, or elsewhere in our wide service area. 

Continue Reading

A Short-Cycling AC May Be a Short-Lived AC!

Monday, September 6th, 2021
ac-grill

A central air conditioning system runs in cycles: the thermostat sends a request for cooling to the air conditioner’s control board, the board turns on the compressor to place refrigerant under pressure, and the refrigerant circulates to remove heat from indoors. The cycle concludes after the thermostat registers the AC has met the target temperature, causing the compressor to cycle down (although the blower fan may continue to run).

A standard cooling cycle lasts for 15 minutes or more. This is the minimum time necessary for all parts of the AC to put in the work to make a noticeable difference in the indoor temperature. On hotter days, the cycle will last longer. 

Continue Reading